IF YOU ARE WONDERING WHY ON EARTH BOB IS MAKING CANES THAT STAND ALONE, THERE IS A LOGICAL EXPLANATION.

YOU SEE, HE HAS BEEN COMPLAINING AND WHINING FOR YEARS ABOUT MOST CANES, BECAUSE THEY FALL VERY EASILY WHENEVER YOU LEAN THEM UP AGAINST ANYTHING LIKE A CHAIR OR WALL OR QUAKING ASPEN TREE OR HORSE.



BOB SAID MANY TIMES THAT SOMEONE SHOULD INVENT A CANE THAT STANDS BY ITSELF.

I INVITED A NUMBER OF FRIENDS TO PARTICIPATE IN THIS PROJECT. IF THEY DELIVERED TO ME A SHOE OR OTHER OBJECT, I WOULD DESIGN AND MAKE A CANE FOR THEM USING THE OBJECT THEY SENT ME.


MOST OF THE CANES I MADE FOR MYSELF USING MY COLLECTION OF SHOES ARE FOR SALE. THE GIFTED CANES I MADE FOR THE PARTICIPANTS ARE NOT FOR SALE BECAUSE THEY WILL BECOME CHERISHED POSSESSIONS.

I made this cane for Brian Goeltzenleuchter. The representation of the straight razor has several meanings while the basketball makes reference to Brian’s complete dedication to playing basketball three times a week. No fragrance.
Acrobats need canes too. $350.
The basket slippers, snake, and colors come from the island of French Martinique in the Caribbean. $500.
This first cane Bob made for this series and himself uses a saddle shoe he purchased in New York City in 1969 on sale at a Florsheims store. It was too small and caused serious blisters on his heels. He had to visit a shady looking NYC urgent care facility for dressings. The main shaft was very expensive because it is made of solid Rosewood turned by hand on a lathe, with a silver band. He bought it online during his impulsive years when he also bought an electric scooter. Now he has his eyes on an electric wheelchair.

"Be prepared" is his motto. If one lives long enough, he or she might need a cane and/or a wheelchair.

N.F.S.

The galvanized pails used for this walking stick or cane resulted from an earlier interest in pails I had in 1964 when I made the plaster pail you see below. The concepts are different.
The handle is an actual and real belaying pin from an old pirate sail boat. In emergency, the pin can be removed from the cane and used as a defensive weapon.
Despite the fact that I am right handed, this cane was made for an anonymous leftie. $500.
I commissioned this very tall carved staff many years ago for myself, Le Gran Directeur of the Great State of Art by an artist whose name I cannot remember. NFS
This swim fin cane was made for Richard Gleaves, who has surfed most of his life. Using the fin was his terrific idea. The cane came from Walmart.
John Lewis was a professional skateboarder in his youth, so it seemed appropriate to me to work with the few skateboard items he has saved from the good old days of flying off the Statue of Liberty.
These two canes were designed for two Texans to use in their pursuit of bad hombres wading across the Rio Grande River. $500. for the pair
I made this cane for our daughter Mary Ann Garner using one of her old roller skates she didn’t know was still in a storage space under our house. The rooster connection was made as a result of my interest in roosters wearing roller skates.
Judy Nicolaidis is a ceramic sculptor who dances one day a week. The handle is supposed to represent a chunk of raw clay just before it is slammed down onto the center of a wheel.
It’s hard to see the shoe Jessica Mc Cambly gave me for her cane, but it definitely steered me in this direction.
The self portrait cane I should have used on my two hikes to Mt. Whitney. $500.
Don Porcella liked the one leg of an old photo tripod. Red is the main color used because of his red shoes. It is a walking stick and has a few pipe cleaners for navigation and two hands grasping the shaft.

My bat, bowling shoes and State of Art handle are in this collection to pay homage to my playing senior softball.

I tried to use the bat in one game without the attached shoe (two were on my feet) but my manager would not allow. $500.

Tara Centybear got this pair of wood clogs shipped to my house from London. The idea of simply using the extra shoe for the cane handle came quickly.
Josh Pavlick’s cane is a collaboration. Our 7 year old grandson Oliver make the shaft for his brother Enzo and gave it to me. it was made from an Aspen tree branch in their yard. With dental plaster, I anchored the shaft into the shoe Josh sent me in the mail.